When should I replace my rear brake pads?

On average, brake pads should be replaced every 40,000 to 50,000 miles, but that number can differ depending on driving conditions and styles. The good news is, you'll likely experience minor symptoms when your brake pads are getting towards their end of life, making diagnosis and repairs easy.

How do I know if my rear brake pads are worn out?

You might need a flashlight to get a good look at the brake pad. If the pads look thin, less than 1/4", it might be time to get them replaced. On some brake pads, you might see a wear indicator slot down the center of the pad. If the slot is gone or just barely visible, it's time for new brake pads.

What is the average life of rear brake pads?

Brake pads may last about 40,000 miles on average, but the range is quite expansive: Typically, it can be anywhere between 20,000 and 65,000 miles.

Related Question when to replace rear brake pads

What should new brake pads feel like?

Under optimum operating conditions, your brake pedal should feel firm throughout its travel. The harder you push it, the firmer it should feel. When you mash the brakes quickly, like we've all done from time to time to avoid rear-ending someone, your brake pedal will be at its firmest.

When should brake pad thickness be replaced?

In most cases, you'll want to replace brake pads when they get down to about 3mm. While you can sometimes get away with 2mm, that is right around where the metal wear indicator gets exposed and causes a squealing sound against the disc.

What causes back brakes to wear fast?

But there is a reason why rear brake pads can wear faster than expected: traction control and electronic stability control. Besides (for some cars) the tire-pressure monitoring system, your ABS is linked to the ESC and traction control, Motor Trend reports.

How do you tell if you need front or back brakes?

  • Listen to the sounds of your brakes. The most obvious indicator your rear brakes need replacing is the squeaking that you hear when you press down on the brakes.
  • Respond to the service light in your car.
  • Check your brake fluid.
  • Press down on your brake pedal for resistance.
  • Do you need to change brake pads and discs together?

    The answer is YES. For example, the brake discs do not need to be changed if the car is relatively new and there is still a lot of disc life left. They absolutely need to be changed if the discs are unevenly worn or badly scored. Braking force is created by the brake pad and brake disc.

    Can you feel the difference with new brake pads?

    Brakes are self-adjusted so you should never feel any difference (except for that first pump after the change). The range of travel should be the same with a brand new pad versus one that is complete worn, since the brake cylinders don't retract back to a fixed position.

    Do I need to bleed my brakes after changing the pads?

    The only way to be sure your system doesn't have an air bubble is to bleed your brakes after repairing the leak. If you're replacing worn brake pads, which can cause air to enter the master cylinder. If you change your rotors or pads. Any brake job should include a brake bleed for safety's sake.

    Should new brakes be sensitive?

    Reduced or Sensitive Pedal Response

    As you step on the pedal, you should feel the pedal becoming progressively firmer as you press harder. The brake pedal should never feel soft or nearly touch the floor when you press on it. If you notice you need to press harder than usual to brake, your pads are likely wearing out.

    How Much Is A Drive Shaft
    How Much Does It Cost To Replace A Catalytic Converter?